FAQs


A Glossary of Shutter Jargon

What is a louvre?

A louvre is the angled slat of a shutter. Louvres are available in different widths. Our craftsmen are able to recommend an appropriate width determined by your style preferences and the type of shutter you select.

What is a mullion?

A mullion is the vertical bar between the panes of glass in a window. Shutters traditionally follow the layout of the window they cover. You may like to hinge or break your shutters where the mullions occur.

What is a transom?

A transom is the strengthening horizontal bar running across a window. Traditionally, shutters follow the layout of the window they cover. Cafe-style shutters will end at the transom. Tier-on-tier shutters will split at the transom.

What is a tilt rod?

A tilt rod is the round length of wood that allows you to angle the louvres. Some tilt rods are integral to the design and discreetly hidden, others are not.

What is a panel?

The term ‘panel’ refers to one section of a shutter. It frames the louvres and is hinged to other panels. The number of panels you can hinge together depends on the weight of the wood.

Cafe-style shutters

This style of shutter covers just the bottom half of a window, beneath a transom.

Tier-on-tier shutters

This style of shutter covers the entire window but is split at the transom, allowing you to operate the top and bottom panels and louvres independently.

Full height shutters

This style of shutter covers the entire height of the window.

Tracked shutters – bi-fold

These shutters are suspended from a top track and concertina when opened.

Tracked shutters – by-pass

These shutters are suspended from a top track and slide behind or in front of one another when opened.